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. six weeks later, the u.s. attack. the wmd's were never found. today we'll speak with media analyst norman solomon and colorado lawrence wilkerson, "with liberty and justice for some: how the law is used to destroy equality and protect the powerful." 's former chief of staff. >> i have admitted to this a number of times publicly and privately, was the person who put together colin powell's presentation on february, five, 2003. probably the biggest mistake of my life. >> u.s. lawmakers are threatening to cut funding to brooklyn college, this will host a forum to mourn at about the palestinian led campaign to boycott and divest from israel. >> extreme radicals, as i said, basically what the state of israel to disappear from the face of the earth. i have a problem with that. they are sponsoring this event. they're supporting ms. event. that is the issue. that is absolutely outrageous. >> we will be joined by one of the speakers at the brooklyn college event, omar barghouti. also, glenn greenwald. another campaign, this went over climate change. students at over 200 campuses are pushing
. and the national guard that had to leave. ♪ ♪ bill: a lot of breaking news this morning on a friday. another u.s. embassy is under attack. this time in turkey. reports of a homicide bomber setting off an explosive device, killing himself and at least one other person. this is brand new video showing chaos at the scene. emergency crews responding as they pick through the rubble in the aftermath on the ground there. this is a story we're just working through right now. but there's a lot of news popping. good morning, i'm bill hemmer. we'll get to all of it today. martha: good morning. i'm martha maccallum. the details on this are still fluid. we're getting reports that the blast went off inside the security check point at the entrance to the embassy. bill: amy kellogg watching it all from london now. has there been a claim of responsibility, amy? >> reporter: not yet, bill. the turkish prime minister erdouan has said it is a suicide bombing there may have been a lot of groups behind this attack or at the u.s. embassy in ankara. it could have been islamist type group operating in turkey. in 2003 th
jeopardizing u.s. national security. stocks rallied on the first day of trading with all three indexes rising two-year highs. the s&p up 11 points: nasdaq 22. volume on the big ward still modest 3.7 billion shares. office depot, officemax advanced merger deals with both companies moving higher. google stock above $800 per share for the first time ever. health care stocks on news medicare advantage payments, to companies for services will be lower than expected, but most of those stocks recovering most of their losses. gold continues its decline closing at 1603.60. crude oil up $0.80. the bond market, weaker prices, higher yield, the treasury's 10-year now 2.03%. apple confirmed today it has been the target of a cyber attack byackers in china who compromised a small number of the employee computers. apple says there's no evidence they were able to steal any data, but as the saying goes, it is early yet. the attack was perpetrated by the same group that hacked faccbook. jeeps twitter profile send out racial slurs, claims the police were using drugs, a hacker group taking responsibility for bot
against u.s. special operations forces that prompted afghan president karzai to order the removal from wardak province. afghan officials said they have received complaints for the past three months that u.s. forces have arrested nine people who have since disappeared. one afghan villagers said her son was taken away and later found dead. >> my son was taken in his body was dropped under a bridge in the river. one of his fingers was cut off. he was beaten very badly. his body was stolen from torture and his throat was slit. why is the government not listening to our voices? why are they not stopping americans from doing such things? while i wanted to stand to talk with the americans, they pulled me back and hit me in the chest with the but of a gun. i still feel pain here since i have been beaten. you can still see the marks on my chest. >> the afghan government is expected to form a commission of inquiry with the u.s.-led nato occupation force to investigate the allegations. on monday, a nato spokesperson said no evidence of wrongdoing has emerged so far. >> between all allegations of
. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a history of discrimination-- mainly in the deep south-- to get federal approval, or pre- clearance, before changing voting procedures or districts. lewis argued the provision-- known as "section five"-- must be preserved. >> there are still forces in this country that want to take us back to another period, but we're not going back. we've come too far. we've made too much progress to go back. the literacy test may be gone; but people are using other means, other tactics and techniques. so we still need section 5 and that's why we are here today standing up fo
's ceremony unveiling a statue of civil rights pioneer rosa parks in the u.s. capitol. >> she lived a life of activism but also a life of dignity and grace. and in a single moment with the simplest of gestures she helped change america and change the world. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the nine justices of the u.s. supreme court pondered a central piece of civil rights legislation today. at issue: whether it's still needed, 48 years after it first became law. >> we are not there yet! >> brown: georgia congressman and civil rights leader john lewis was one of many who rallied outside the court this morning for the voting rights act. they were there on a day the justices heard a challenge to a key section of the law: it requires states with a hist
criticize other countries? the u.s. doesn't admit to owning cyber weapons either just as the chinese don't. it makes it very hard to put together rules about how you would use cyber or not if nobody will admit to have the weapon. at least in the nuclear age we knew who had the weapon. we did, the soviets did. in this case, the american position is that the u.s. never uses any weapon that it has to support individual american corporations and yet the chinese for most of the hacking we've seen, not all but most seem to be going in to get trade secrets, industrial secrets, processes, things that would enable them to keep trying to grow at 6% or 7%. the u.s. uses its cyber tools the way it did in iran which is to mess up the iranian enrichment of uranium, sort of another way of doing ordinary covert action. >> so is the goal of what the chinese seem to be doing to under aspects of the u.s. economy for competitive reasons as opposed to affirmatively trying to harm u.s. corporations, take down their operations which one might interpret as an act of economic warfare? >> no one as yet seen a cas
laws. in fact, the u.s. attorney's office for the northern district of illinois, only 25 federal firearms cases were brought to that office in 2011. only 1% of the people, 62 out of over 4000 were denied guns based on background checks are prosecuted for illegally attempting to acquire firearms. that is too low of a rate. see what can be done by enforcing the law on the books before enforcing new ones. we will legislate in an area that deals with the issue of reporting to the database for the people who are not in there now. make sure that we deal with the mental health issues that are involved with the tragedies that we are talking about today and a lot of other tragedies that have happened. thank you. >> thank you, senator. will the witnesses please stand? affirm the oath as i complete the reading. do you affirm that the testimony you are about to give before the committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth so help you god? >> i do. >> thank you. i will introduce the two witnesses from this panel. the first is john walsh, u.s. attorney. he has served
started a new push for immigration. this past week, also featured contentious hearings on u.s. defense policy and on slowing the epidemic of gun violence in america. we'll take a closer look at guns, first beginning with vice president joe biden's admission after meeting with democratic lawmakers on capitol hill. >> nothing we're going to do is going to fundamentally alter or eliminate the possibility of another mass shooting or guarantee that we will bring the deaths down to a thousand a year from what it is now. >> the government's most recent report says nearly 32,000 people died of gun injuries in 2010. many folks think the biggest obstacle to changing any of the nation's gun laws is the national rifle association. cnn crime and justice correspondent joe johns is joining us, taking a look at the money and influence at the nation's capitol. >> right, and wolf, money donated to canada is just one way to measure political influence in washington, like other areas, grass roots organizing. and with the battle hitting capitol hill this week, we took a look at the money the rifle associat
protecting us, we would have died. god help us. >> in the u.s., georgia is set to put a man did that tonight despite consensus among medical specialists is mentally disabled. warren hill was sentenced to die 1991 for killing a fellow prisoner. all three doctors who originally said hill did not be the legal definition of mental retarded have since reversed their opinion, saying their original evaluation was extremely and unusually rushed and did not allow for an accurate assessment of his condition. his lawyers say his men to capacity peaked at a sixth grade level. while the supreme court bans the execution of mentally disabled people, it allows states leeway to decide who qualifies. georgia is the only state requires a defendant to prove such disabilities beyond a reasonable doubt. it would be the first georgia prisoner to be executed since the killing of troy anthony davis prompted global outrage in 2011. davis was killed despite major doubts about his guilt after seven of the nine non-police witnesses in his case recanted their testimony. colorado lawmakers have passed a series of strict g
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
the ridiculous drone strikes on u.s. citizens without a trial. president obama, as soon as the law allowed. i would close gitmo, send everyone in there to a maximum security prison in colorado where we have nickels who was part of oklahoma city bombing where we have the union in uni bomber and the original world trade center bombing terrorist. i think we are strong enough, and we will do it, and i challenge you to defy me. speaking of defying him, one final thing. we have a consumer financial protection bureau. the republicans say we're going to block him. we won't let you get him confirmed. if i was president obama i'd say hey listen. that's easy enough. underneath richard cordray i'm going to nominate neil bar ox vs confident y. he was inspector general for tarp, and he's got no love lost for these banks that are doing out of control risk with our money. you want to get rid of court ray, that problem. you want to get rid of barovsky? i'll put in dennis kucinich. that's how you do a strong state of the union. president obama will enter tonight, shake a lot of hands my guess is his speech wil
and the commitment of u.s. troops overseas, but also with respect to the day to day decisions that the secretary must make to ensure that our men and women in uniform and their families received the support and assistance they need and deserve. it would be a positive message for our soldiers, sailors, airmen and marines in harm's way around the world to know that one of their own holds the highest office in the department of defense, and that he has their backs. senator hagel, you would be in position to make key decisions on afghanistan. the secretary of defense is called upon to advise the president on the size and mission of a post-2014 so- called residual force, and the pace of the drawdown between now and the end of 2014. the key to this transition is ensuring the readiness and ability of afghan security forces to take over the defense of their own country. i always believed that would be our main mission and its key to success. during my trip to afghanistan with senator jack reed last month, we heard from u.s. commanders on the ground that afghan security forces are operating on their own on mo
community to curb the flow of arms into syria. another member of the u.s. senate has decided to step aside. republican mike johanns of nebraska announced today he will not seek a second term next year. in a statement, he said he wants to spend more time with his family, after spending 32 of his 62 years in various offices. johanns is the fifth senator to announce plans to retire next year. a hall of fame figure in pro basketball, former los angeles lakers owner jerry buss, died today. he'd battled cancer for months. buss ran the lakers for nearly 34 years, and they won ten n.b.a. championships during that time. along the way, he brought in star players from kareem abdul- jabbar to magic johnson to kobe bryant. he was also one of the first owners to create his own cable tv network, and sell the naming rights to his arena. jerry buss was 80 years old. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn to this weekend's protests and the big debate over the extension of an oil pipeline from canada into the u.s. as the u.s. tries to navigate between clean ene
of troops stationed in south korea. the u.s. and allies may respond by putting their forces on higher alert and building new missile defenses. that will make for more attention and instability in asia. kim jong-un has his finger on the nuclear trigger. he may find himself more isolated and threatened, not more secure. he's already warning that any new sanctions may lead to new nuclear tests. the bbc news, seoul. >> more threatened. that is a worrying prospect. i am joined by the senior adviser for east asia policy at the u.s. defense department. thank you for coming in. what do we know about this latest test? >> the details are still coming in. we think it was more powerful and relatively successful than previous tests in 2006-2009. we're still trying to figure out whether it was using plutonium or highly enriched uranium. >> what is the significant? >> highly enriched uranium would be new. they have limited stockpiles of plutonium carried they would use that up in their testing process. >> we have the united nations saying this is a threat to international security. how much is that true?
much for that. >>> there's word that u.s. may be changing its policy on aid to rebels in syria. nbc news has been told by senior official that is the u.s. will announce some aid will be given directly to certain syrian opposition groups rather than through nongovernmental agencies. the nonlethal aids could include body armor military training, and vehicles, but not weapons. the uprising against president bashar al assad began in 2011. >>> the u.s. supreme court is expected to make an important decision about the voting rights act by june. the high court heard arguments on a key part of the law that requires states with a history of civil rights discrimination to get permission in advance before changing their voting laws. shelby county, alabama, brought the case saying the law was outdated. outside the court hundreds of protesters from shelby county rallied to support the law as it is. the nine justices are expected to meet in private to discuss the merits of the case. >>> it is time now for weather. bill karens is here with the forecast. good morning. >> a rainy forecast in the nor
falling? who is hacking the u.s.? itself company, it's government, itself citizens and what are we doing about it? plus, two months after newtown. >> families of newtown deserve a vote. gwen: as a week of special pbs coverage of gun violence draws to a close, we examine the ongoing debate in washington, in state houses in city halls. >> if a gun that was used 69 days ago to slaughter 20 children and six adults isn't an assault weapon, then they don't exist. >> a debate that is just beginning. covering the week, john harwood of cnbc and the "new york times." david sanger of the "new york times." molly ball of the atlantic, and sari horwitz of "the washington post." >> award-winning coverage and adge sys, covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week" with gwen ifill. corporate funding for washington week is provided by -- >> we know why we're here, to chart a greener path in the air and in our factories. >> to find cleaner more efficient ways to power flight. >> and harness our technology for new energy solutions. >> around the globe the people o
't giving up yet. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." cutting our pay. that's how one u.s. officer says u.s. troops view the recommendation for a smaller pay increase in 2014. no one goes into the military to get rich but most servicemen and women need every dollar in their paycheck. so worried that next paycheck may be smaller is not going over well among the troops. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr has the details. she's working the story. barbara, what's going on? >> wolf, in this town, there's nothing that causes more anxiety in budget politics than the concept of cutting the pay for the troops. but that is exactly what is on the table if congress and the president cannot reach an agreement on a spending plan. the troops usually are happy to see defense secretary leon panetta, smiles and handshakes all around. but days before he leaves office, panetta has bad news. he's proposing less money in their paycheck next year. panetta, a savvy washington operative in budget politics, is leaving it to congress to figure out how not to cut pay and keep thousands of defen
say they do not have the capability to make a bomb. >> well, zoraida, it will be days before the u.s. has a very good handle on the size of the explosion, the size of the payload, but at first glance what u.s. officials are very concerned about are north korea's claims that it testified a miniaturized nuclear weapon. why is that so concerning? that means they're closer to making a missile that they could launch toward the united states. these types of dplier tesnuclea moves them closer to mastering the idea. it was expected, officials tell me, that north korea warned the u.s. and china yesterday that a test was eminent. after the test president obama issued a statement. what he said was north korea's nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs constitute a threat to u.s. national security and to international peace and security. we will strengthen close coordination with allies and partners and work with our six-party partners,united nations security council and other u.n. member states to pursue this. they will be meeting this morning in an emergency session. my source is telling
to just under 2%. a flight to safety. snap up u.s. government debt. all eyes on ben bernanke, speaking of interest rates. a semiannual testimony in front of the senate banking committee tomorrow joining me now, alec for the markets and the economy. seniorconomist.@ great to see you again. before we get all of that, i know you were a speaker at the big governors confab this weekend, and sequestration was also a huge topic of conversation. we know what the president releasing a state-by-state impact of the sequestration, he's trying to get the governors on board with his fight to promote his cause. how the governors feel about that? was your impression participating in the conference this weekend? >> everyone is concerned, and the way that i lay it out, we really don't know. i mean, you think it is much ado about nothing or another moment. and you would think that it is -- $44 billion, they say it's 85, but that's actually budget authority. and you would think in that three and a half trillion dollar budget that we could do that without bringing about armageddon. i mean it just seems --
night this week while the u.s. senate is on presidents' day break, we are featuring booktv in prime time. tonight, the financial industry of what led to the crisis. >> all of that live tonight on c-span. >> from the very start we told the board that the approach we're going to take, which was pretty straightforward, and remember, we were sent there to sort of fix gm. that was the nation, is go make this thing a viable company again. so we were all focused. i brought the message we were going to design, build and sell the world's best vehicles. we're going to move quickly. we need your support, and we need your input. and so we changed a few things about the board meeting. we shortened them considerably. we stayed away from the details or didn't get in the weeds on how you build a car, but the bigger question of financing, morale, positioning marketing, that sort of thing. the board was very supportive of that. and we kept them informed and you know, we just took off. >> leading general motors through bankruptcy and a government bailout, former chairman and ceo ed whitacre on "american tu
through the laundry. criminal charges are a whole other kettle of fish. the u.s. attorney in los angeles investigated lance armstrong for almost two years and suddenly weirdly dropped everything without explaining anything a year ago, and reporters yesterday had a shot at asking whether the whole oprah interview and the admission i'm a druggy changed anything, when it comes to how the feds look at their set of facts. here's what he said. take a look. >> we made a decision on that case i believe it's a little over a year ago. obviously we have been well aware of the statements that have been made by mr. armstrong and other media reports. that's not changed my view at this time. we will continue to look at the situation. but it hasn't changed our view as i stand here today. >> it hasn't changed our view as i stand here today. jeffrey toobin, that's one u.s. attorney based in southern california, do all of the u.s. attorney's all over the country work in concert? or might one u.s. attorney say on another coast be working on a whole different investigation that he might not know about? >> th
can reach a deal in order to avoid it. and on this day in 1980, the u.s. hockey team beat finland and taking home olympic gold in lake placid. two days earlier, the united states beat the soviet union in what is still knowns miracle on ice. our producer and i love a good game of hockey, don't you maria. she just said yes. one team in the way of olympic gold, finland. the fins took an early lead, but the u.s. struck back, scoring three goals in the third period, the final score 4-2 and a group of american amateurs took home olympic gold 33 years ago today. can't you still hear them cheering? that's how fox reports on this sunday, february 24th, 2013. i'm harris falkner, have a fantastic week. and in about four seconds, huckabee. >> tonight on huckabee. >> i will veto any effort to get rid of those automatic spending cuts. >> he was for it before he was against it. >> these cuts known here in washington as sequestration are a bad idea. >> but now he's blaming republicans. senator lindsey graham on the sequestration showdown and how is our government defending us from cyber attacks?
will have more coming up. stay tuned. w >>> the u.s. postal service makes a drastic move to save money. we'll have live coverage of the news conference about to get underway. >> reporter: an investigation into a triple homicide here in sonoma county moves into the second day. coming up we'll show you where all of this happened and we'll tell you what police are saying. >>> the police released the last known photos of that teenaged girl found dead in a bay area park. new information is about to be leased. >>> police in palo alto are sitching for a man wanted -- searching for a man wanted for a frightening crime. "mornings on 2" starts now. >>> well, good morning. i'm dave clark. >> i'm tori campbell. it's wednesday, february 6th. >>> we begin with continuing coverage of a deadly crime in rural west sonoma county. sheriff deputies are still on the scene of a triple homicide. officers found the bodies of three men inside a small home in forestville. ktvu's claudine wong joins us live from outside of the home to let us know what sheriff deputies reveal. it's not much, is it, claudine? >> repor
abuse by priests. also, this week, the president of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops, cardinal timothy dolan of new york was formally questioned by lawyers for sex abuse victims. the deposition centered on dolan's handling of abuse while he oversaw the milwaukee archdiocese. >>> as president obama this week urged congress to prevent massive federal spending cuts from going into effect march 1st, many religious groups argued the so-called sequester would disproportionately impact low-income americans. although social security, medicare and some anti-poverty programs are protected, the groups pointed to likely cuts in programs that provide food and other assistance. they called those cuts unconscionable and immoral. >>> human rights and religious freedom advocates are ramping up pressure on iran to release an iranian-born american christian pastor who was recently sentenced to eight years in prison there. saeed abedini was convicted last month of threatening iran's national security by helping to expand the house church movement. 80 members of the u.s. congress wrote to secretary
immigrants on a pooth to u.s. citizenship. how it could complicate bipartisan efforts to pass immigration reform. >>> breaking the glass ceiling at nearly 200 miles an hour. danica patrick's historic achievement that could make us all proud, women drivers, huh. no more comments like that from you, jon scott. jon: okay. jenna: it's all "happening now." jenna: jon never made a rude comment about women drivers. i was just teasing. jon: i never have ridden in a car with you, at least with you behind the wheel. jenna: probably a good thing. hi, everybody, i'm jenna lee. jon: i'm jon scott. we begin with a tragic tend to a troubled country star. investigators say mindy mccready died apparently of a self-inflicted gunshot wound at her home arkansas. she rose to the top of the charts with its like "10,000 angels" and "guys do it all the time" before personal problems sidetracked to her career. mccready's boyfriend and the father of her youngest son died one month ago on the same porch where her body was found over the weekend. casey stiegel is live from the dallas bureau. her buy friend also took
, february 22. the president will meet with the japanese prime minister today. u.s.-japanese trade is among the top issue -- top issues. the league debate on spending, taxes, and budget. that will be the focus of much of next week's debate in washington. one week to do -- one week to go until sequestration -- will it matter? here are the numbers -- join the conversation on facebook and twitter.com. sanders said -- send us an email. what is the definition of sequestration? one is this -- it is that fiscal policy procedure adopted by congress to deal with the federal budget deficit. that is according -- some news over the last 24 hours as the president reaches out to republican leaders in the house and senate. a phone conversation between the president and republican leaders mitch mcconnell and john boehner. our guest follows the story for the hill newspaper. what news came out of these phone conversations? guest: not much from the press secretary or congressional leaders. they have been very tight- lipped. it is interesting to say that things do seem to be heating up little bit. congress wil
't return to the u-s until march. today mayor jean quan said oakland is taking steps toward becoming a safer city. in her annual state of the city address quan devoted a third of her speech to the fight against crime. - as mayor there is nothing more important to me than the safety of every individual in this city - growing the police department from the current staffing of 611 officers back to 800 within five years. - oakland's economy, which gained more than 5,000 jobs over the past year. - the uptown arts and entertainment district was continuing to grow -the city still has major hurdles to climb. -the city moved ahead with redeveloping the former oakland army base and avoided layoffs for the first time since the 2008 financial collapse. the mayor also called on eveyone in the city to work together to lower crime rates. in national news. the white house is saying. efforts to avoid the 85- billion dollars in automatic budget cuts. are unlikely to succeed. before those cuts are set to kick in on friday. president barack obama and congressional leaders are scheduled to meet friday-- the day
them stay in the u.s. for permanent legal status and according to the report letting immigrants stay in the country. if they have less than three criminal convictions and haven't spent more than a year in prison. >> we are doing exactly what we said we'd do. we'll be prepared which we're very aggressively supporting. >> at first glance, the proposals go beyond what the president himself laid out less than a week ago. >> the time has come to pass comprehensive immigration reform. >> in his state of the union address, president obama said illegal immigrants should not benefit over illegal immigrants. >> a path that includes passing a background check. learning english and going to the back of the line behind the folks trying to come here legally. >> democrats are eager to hold on to the 71% latino votes they want in the 2012 election. republicans are trying to show they are not antiimmigrant. analysts say the stakes for both sides are high. >> the republicans think they need to do immigration reform to get hispanics back into the party. they promised hispanics immigration reform. >> an
, that the u.s. patent office issued a patent. i will not give you a pop quiz. it was labeled john deere plow. the implement sketched out could have easily been labeled one of the most important inventions in history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast iron with smooth innovation, it opened up swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for my hometown to exist. beforehand, tilling an acre took a full 24 hours. afterward, as little as five. every toil ended another assumption of what the land could produce. it is not just the start of agricultural success, but of national success. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead and increase harvest and feed the whole world. sometimes these innovations come from the most advanced science. other times they are simple steps and ideas that come from looking at and listening closely to the problem. all of them can break down barriers to food security. it can allow us to allow new paths of progress. we need those new pathways forward. take a look at a few recent headlines. "drough
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 369 (some duplicates have been removed)